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Am I Worthy?

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By Marci Liroff

How do you feel when you’re walking into the audition room? Are you truly feeling confident? Or do you think it’s like the lottery and hope that they “pick me. Just give me the job!” When you’re coming into an audition you have to ask yourself, “Am I worthy?” If you don’t think you are, then you’re not ready and you’re sending the room that signal.

Casting my latest film, I’m seeing several actors walk into the room in a very tentative way. I can almost see the thought bubble over their head: “I’m never gonna get this. I’m so bad at comedy. All the other girls looked like models.” I can tell that they don’t feel like they should be there and we’re going to discover that they’ve been fooling us all along. They don’t deserve it.

Years ago I was casting a pilot that called for a sexy young woman to work in a men’s high-end shave shop. A funny actor we loved came into the room (which included the creator, producer, writer, and director) and blurted out…

“Gosh, I never get these roles. I’m such a tomboy—everybody thinks I have a dick!”

A hush fell over the room for a moment and then we all laughed. She then did the scene with our lead actor and was truly funny. After she left, all the people in the room looked at me questioningly, like, ”Does she really have a dick?!” That’s all they could think about. They obsessed about it for the entire session. In her nervousness and self-deprecating humor, she had planted a seed and now they couldn’t see past it because she truly didn’t believe that she deserved to be there. She had successfully shot herself in the foot.

Some say “fake it till you make it.” In her TED Talk, social psychologist Amy Cuddy talks about how body language shapes who you are. She shows how “power posing”—standing in a posture of confidence even when we don’t feel confident—can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain and might even have an impact on our chances for success. In her video, she suggests going into the bathroom before an important meeting and adopting the power pose for a few minutes (think Wonder Woman: hands on hips, legs firmly planted and slightly apart). Hey, even I do it before important meetings with executives. It definitely works!

So much of how you present yourself is in your head. Once the preparation has been done, it’s all about perspective—and this is the good news: You are in control of how you view the audition process. You have the choice of how you’re going to view your audition and how you view it thereafter. Are you going to kick yourself time and time again that you didn’t do what you wanted to do in an audition? Or are you going to learn from it—specifically what went wrong or what sent you off the rails? Are you going to continue to let that voice inside your head tell you you’re no good? Or are you going to master that voice and banish it not only from the room but your head forever? You have this choice. Take back that power.

Make sure to check out my new online course “How To Audition For Film and Television: Audition Bootcamp”. You can view it on your laptop or your mobile device and your subscription gives you lifetime viewing privileges for this course. I’ll be adding lectures throughout the year.

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The Secret to Skype Auditions

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By Marci Liroff

I’ve long been a fan of technology, especially in my casting office. I’ve gone from having a bookcase overflowing with Betamax tapes to links to actors’ videos on my laptop. Years ago, if I wanted a demo reel on an actor, I would have to go to Blockbuster, rent tapes, and edit it myself. Or, if the agent was very savvy, I would ask for it and it would arrive via messenger into the studio mailroom, then finally delivered to me 48–72 hours later. Not a good way to do business!

Information needs to be attainable lightning fast.

Nowadays, when I’m on the phone with an agent, she can instantaneously send me a link to an actor and we can talk about it in real time. The same applies to auditioning. If I need to see your audition and you’re not in my city, I’ll request one from your agent or manager. And if you’re set up at home with the right equipment, I can get it within a few hours. On my latest film, I’ve been very impressed with the quality of the self-taped auditions that have been sent my way. They are usually well-lit, the sound is good, and the actor has taken the time to find a good reader—which really helps with the process. This is so easy to do yourself once you understand how to use your equipment to your benefit. My article “How to Self-Tape Your Audition Like a Rock Star” has helped thousands of people.

The new trend (although not so new to me) is auditioning via Skype with the director. Since the director is not usually in your hometown, if we like your self-taped audition we’ll set up a virtual “meeting” through Skype so that the director and actor can discuss the project and get to know each other. I’ve been using this method for several years with my tech-savvy director clients, with a little twist.

My director wants to work with you via Skype while you rerecord your audition. You’ll tape your audition on your video camera, like usual, but he’s essentially “in the room” with you via Skype with your laptop pointed toward you. He can watch you audition, give you notes, and redirect you throughout your takes. Then you send in the link to what your camera taped for our review. I’ve hired actors for leading roles a few times with this method without ever being in the same room with them. (In those cases, the actors were somewhat well-known and had a body of work to show in addition to our audition.)

I’ve also “beamed” my director into the audition room when he’s off on location, and I’ve set up auditions in my L.A. office. I prop my laptop up on a large box atop a chair, and it’s almost like he’s there giving you direction. I have a special camera that hooks into my computer and bypasses the laptop camera, so that when we Skype or FaceTime, he’s actually seeing what my camera sees instead of the laptop camera. Pretty cool, huh?

Through the years I’ve noticed that some actors are comfortable with this process and truly excel, and some are extremely befuddled by it. They don’t know where to look or which camera to act toward. They should be connecting with their reader, who is standing right next to the tripod of the camera shooting their audition, and then connecting with the director (on their laptop) to get direction on the scene and to talk.

At this point in the game, you’ve got to familiarize yourself with the latest technology so it’s like second nature when the opportunity knocks. Practice at home with your friends who live out of town. Have meetings on Skype, FaceTime, and Google Hangouts so that you’re familiar with the different platforms.

Most of all, have fun with it! The future is here!

Make sure to check out my new online course “How To Audition For Film and Television: Audition Bootcamp”. You can view it on your laptop or your mobile device and your subscription gives you lifetime viewing privileges for this course. I’ll be adding lectures throughout the year.

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Is Your Agent One Of The Good Guys?

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By Marci Liroff

My relationships with agents and managers are essential to my business.

Since I’ve been casting for several years, some of these relationships go back over 35 years, to the days before cellphones, fax machines, and (gasp!) email. Back then, agents would stop by my office to sit in the lobby, read the scripts, and submit clients by going through their book of photos. Hard to imagine, isn’t it?

Nowadays, communication is lightning-fast and a lot can be lost in translation when we take the “face-to-face” out of the equation. As an actor you need to make sure that your agent is representing you with integrity and precision. From my years-long relationship with an agent or manager, I learn whether I can trust them to have good taste and honesty when I’m negotiating a deal or checking a client’s quote (what they earned). If an agent lies to me about an actor’s salary I know I can’t trust them—at all.

When an agent or manager tries to go around me and deal directly with my director or producer, I realize they don’t respect me or the process. The other day an agent said that his client needed to read with the director, not me. I pointed out that I’ve worked with this director for the last 12 years and no one goes straight to him unless I know their work intimately or I’ve read them before. I explained that the casting director isn’t a hurdle to be jumped over, but a relationship to foster. That actor got to come in and work with me beforehand and get the bonus of all the inside information I had before she read for the director.

When I release a Breakdown or put out the word to the agency and management community (through Backstage, for instance) that I’m casting a project, the submissions start to flow. Actually, it’s more like a barrage. Many times agents use photos that are 10 years old and black-and-white (which we don’t use anymore), or résumés that aren’t updated. Or they’ll call or email with a client suggestion and not include a link to their demo along with a photo and résumé. Lazy? Careless? Overworked? I’m not sure—but it’s not effective in the least.

You’ve got to “police” your agent (and his or her assistant) to make sure your most up-to-date information is being sent.

When we go through the Breakdown we view it in the order it’s submitted. Many other casting offices will view it by agency—viewing the “biggies” first. I don’t play favorites by representation. I make my choices of who I want to see by the photo, résumé, training, and video clips, not by my favorite agents. That said, if an agent with whom I have a longtime relationship calls me and says, “You’ve got to meet this kid!” I do it because I trust them.

Some agents submit what we call a “laundry list” of their clients. I hate this. Instead of actually reading the screenplay, they just read the Breakdown character description (the equivalent of not reading the book in college and only reading the Cliff’s Notes). Because they haven’t read the script they don’t understand the tone of the project and their submissions are usually off. Instead of suggesting a small handful of handpicked clients, they send all their clients in that age range. I truly appreciate the agents who go the extra mile (which, frankly, shouldn’t be extra) and read the script and send me well–thought-out choices.

After over 35 years as a casting director there are only a couple of agents and managers I won’t deal with. This is due to their lack of integrity and professionalism. That said, if there’s an actor I need to see, I don’t hold it against them that they’re represented by these asshats. I find a way to get them in anyway.

When signing with a potential representative, you need to do the groundwork to check their reputation within the industry. Ask around and make sure you’re with one of the good guys.

Make sure to check out my new online course “How To Audition For Film and Television: Audition Bootcamp”. You can view it on your laptop or your mobile device and your subscription gives you lifetime viewing privileges for this course. I’ll be adding lectures throughout the year.

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