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AUDITION BOOTCAMP ONLINE COURSE IS HERE!

“How To Audition For Film and Television: Audition Bootcamp” is now online!

 

Hey gang, Happy Holidays! I wanted to let you in on a special limited time offer on a new online course I’ve created. Thousands of people have bought my Audition Bootcamp DVD and many have asked me to put it online.

Are you a really well trained actor, but you seem to stumble when it comes to auditioning?!

Or, are you just starting out and need a road map to navigate the slippery slopes in Hollywood?

How would you like a VIP pass to learn casting secrets on booking more acting jobs from one of the top Casting Directors?

Based on my top-selling DVD, Marci Liroff’s Audition Bootcamp, I created a one-of-a-kind online class to help actors learn exactly what it takes to win the role in a film and television audition. I’ll take you step by step on the audition process.

This is a must have for any actor! The online course is designed to provide a clear perspective of acting and auditioning from the business end to the creative side. From my over 35 years as a casting director and producer, I will give you insider secrets such as:

  • Audition techniques that will make them remember you
  • Re-framing your perspective to book more jobs
  • On-camera technique to show that you’re a pro
  • Essential knowledge into the competitive world of auditioning from the point of view of directors, producers, studio executives and casting directors.
  • Easy-to-follow video clips take you through the process from preparation, what you should be doing in the audition room (and what not to do!), and your all-important mindset before, during and after the audition.
  • As an added bonus, several of my blog articles are included throughout to highlight the course.

Competition is huge in this business – this course will give you the edge over other actors.

I know you’re all being sold gimmicks and tools and shortcuts to “Get on the red carpet” and “Get on the A-List”…frankly I don’t think that should be your goal. If all you’re seeking is fame, then you’re probably in it for the wrong reasons.

I believe, and I think you do too, that you’re an artist – a storyteller. You want to be on stage and on screen because you have a story to share and characters to embody.

“Your audition should not feel like a visit to the doctor! It is your time to show us what you’ve got. I will help you feel more in your body than you’ve ever felt before.” – Marci Liroff

Read what people are saying about Marci Liroff’s “How To Audition For Film And Television: Audition Bootcamp” – scroll down after class description to “Testimonials”

I’m teaching this course on the UDEMY website. UDEMY is an online education platform and one of the largest destinations for online courses. I find it to be easy to use, free to join, well organized and once you subscribe you have lifetime access to my course.

The course is priced at $29. You can get a lifetime of viewing for this course here. I’ll be adding new lectures throughout the year.

Make a commitment to yourself and take advantage of a rare opportunity to sharpen your audition skills under the guidance of one of the most respected and successful casting directors in Hollywood.

Happy Holidays everyone. I hope you’ll take advantage of this offer!

Marci Liroff

WHEN IS THE RIGHT TIME FOR YOUR CHILD TO BECOME AN ACTOR?

By Marci Liroff

410929439_f2b867589c_oPhoto credit: skalas2

So your child wants to be an actor? Really? Please think about this long and hard. Let me share my perspective as someone who has worked with children for the last 35 years as a casting director and acting coach.

Whenever I meet a child actor I always ask them how they got into acting—what makes them want to be an actor? “Well, my mom and I were at the mall and this lady came up to us and said, ‘You should be a model! Let’s get some headshots of you! Then we got my pictures taken and now I’m an actor!” This response always breaks my heart: “There was this convention in town and I went with my parents and they picked me! My parents paid a few thousand dollars and I met a bunch of agents and now I’m an actor.” Or this classic one: “I really don’t remember how I got started or why. It’s ok I guess.” Or my least favorite, “I want to be famous!”

Here’s what I actually want to hear: “I asked my mom if she could get me involved in acting because I just love it. She said no, but I kept asking her every year and she finally said yes. I’ve been in plays at school and just can’t wait to start my new acting class.” Or, “Because I have to. I need to tell stories.” A wise little girl told me, “I just love to zip out of me and zip into another character.” These are the kids that make it. These are the kids who are there for the right reason.

Anne Henry, co-founder of BizParentz Foundation and the mother of a young actress herself, says, “When kids are asked why they want to act, I like to hear things like ‘I love to create characters and tell stories. I love to make people laugh.’ Or ‘If I couldn’t be a professional actor, I’d still be performing somewhere—at my school, in a class, or in community theatre.’ I’m looking for some sort of answer that tells me that the child likes the day-to-day job of acting.

Rather than ask kids why they want to act, I like to ask them about their favorite acting experience and why it was great. Their answer will tell you a lot, and tends to negate any canned answers they learned from their parents.

On the flip side, I cringe when a child says, ‘I want to make money’ or ‘I want to be on the Disney Channel.’ When I get that kind of answer, I know that they don’t love the art. That answer tells me that they bought into the fame myth or they haven’t actually done any acting. If this is their perspective, they are unlikely to have the stamina for the real job—they just want the result (fame), not career itself (acting). They probably don’t understand that fame for a child is usually not very fun, and not very likely.

When I talk to the parents of committed successful professional actors, they say things like ‘My child has been reading, making up stories, and performing their whole life. They begged me to let them audition for the play, get them into an acting class.’ Wise parents will talk about doing everything they could in their local community, and watching their child have success and accolades from lots of different sources before they enter the professional arena.”

Talk to your child before and during their journey into acting to make sure they’re here for the right reasons.

If you started as a child actor, how and why did you get into it? Parents – please share as well!

Glad you’re here!

Marci

 

 

 

HOW KEEPING A DIARY CAN HELP YOU BOOK THE JOB

By Marci Liroff

276429939_51da76025bPhoto credit: Kiwanja

Remember when you were a kid and you kept a diary next to your bed and wrote down everything you did and thought about that day? Those childhood habits were actually great training for what you should be doing as an actor. Tracking every meeting and audition is a great practice to get into.

I’ve been preaching this to my classes and my coaching clients for years now. They always come back to thank me and point out that this one thing has changed their perspective on their career. Sometimes what you do as an actor – the prep, the auditions, the sheer tenacity you put into your career to get an acting job – can be an intangible thing when you don’t actually get the job and you effectively have nothing to show. But, like I always say, “this is not a sprint it’s a marathon”. So much effort goes into getting the job and keeping a diary or a journal of all your auditions will help you see your progress in black and white.

I suggest you keep a notebook and write down every meeting and audition you have. List the people you’ve met and their position, the project, the role, what you wore, and what choices you made for your audition. Take short notes on what you discussed if you got into a chat with the director. When it starts getting busy during pilot season and you’re going on several auditions each week, and hopefully getting callbacks, it’ll be great to know exactly what you did on each audition that got you back in the room a second time because you’re chronicling it in your book.

You’re going to have a long and busy career and you will probably have a few different people represent you along the way. When you start a new relationship with an agent or manager, wouldn’t it be great if you could give them some actual tools to help you? You can sit down with them in your initial meeting and give them a list of people who are your fans, casting directors who consistently bring you back, and a list of those that you need an introduction. This way you can plan a strategy on which rooms you need to get into.

Actor friend William Mapother goes a step further using an Excel Spreadsheet.

“I keep an ‘Auditions’ spreadsheet in Excel. It has 6 columns: CD, Date, Project, Role (character name), Type (feature, pilot, recurring, guest), and Studio/Co./Network.  I use Excel because it allows me to easily sort the data to see how many times I’ve seen a CD, or to see how many appointments I’ve had over any period of time.”

Here’s the part I love. “When I book a job I change the font in that row to red.  Also, once I book via a CD, I make that CD’s name red throughout document.

Mapother continues, “I also keep another Excel spreadsheet in which I note lessons I’ve learned in various areas and make notes to avoid re-committing horrendous blunders. I’ve noted when circumstances before an audition have helped or hurt me – being hungry, working out, interacting with other actors who are waiting.  The purpose is to experiment and identify what helps me. “Another lesson came not from my experiences, but from reading.  One of Pixar’s rules:  Errors are inevitable, so make them ASAP.  Experiment early.  I noted this in my lessons as “Be wrong as quickly as you can.”

Is this something that you do already? Please share how you’ve been tracking your auditions and meetings in the comments section.

Glad you’re here!

Marci

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